What are the chances of it happening to me?

It is worth considering for a moment that statistics show just how wrong we are to disregard the possibility of suddenly not being able to generate an income if struck down by a critical illness. The chances of it happening are not as remote as we may imagine.

More than half of these – 8 million – occurred in economically developing countries. 8.2 million: The number of cancer deaths in 2012 worldwide. 21.7 million: The number of new cancer cases expected to be diagnosed in 2030. Moreover, by 2030, 13 million cancer deaths are predicted.
*Source: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/worldwide-cancer#heading-Zero

Things are not always grim when there's a plan.

So why don’t we?

In reality, we tell ourselves it is not necessary, we do not believe it will happen to us. Unfortunately, this means that too many people face the daunting prospect of not only having to cope with their illness but having the additional strain of worrying about financial commitments they simply have no way of meeting.

Survival rates increasing – what it means to you

In the event of death, a life insurance policy can cover expenses and costs associated with the potential loss of the primary source of income for a family. What most of us do not fully consider are the financial consequences of surviving, or continuing to suffer from a critical illness. Advances in the medical profession have resulted in vast improvements in survival rates of patients – what would once have been fatal is not always so now. While this progress must be praised, it has resulted in millions of previously independent individuals struggling to meet their financial commitments.

  • Worldwide, almost 32.5 million people diagnosed with cancer within the five years previously were alive at the end of 2012 (estimated).
  • An estimated 169.3 million years of healthy life were lost globally because of cancer in 2008.
  • Worldwide there will be 23.6 million new cases of cancer each year by 2030 (estimated), and approximately more than 40% will survive
  • The global burden of stroke – Every year, 15 million people worldwide suffer a stroke. Nearly six million die and another five million are left permanently disabled. Stroke is the second leading cause of disability, after dementia.  Disability may include loss of vision and/or speech, paralysis, and confusion.

http://www.world-heart-federation.org/cardiovascular-health/stroke/

If you found yourself in this position, how would you cope?